Category Archives: NMDA News and Hot Topics

New Mexico Departments of Agriculture and Tourism promote local businesses during stay-at-home order


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

NMDA Contact:?Baylee Banks
Communications Assistant, New Mexico Department of Agriculture
bbanks@nmda.nmsu.edu
575-646-1864

NMTD Contact: Cody Johnson
Public Information Officer, New Mexico Tourism Department
Cody.johnson2@state.nm.us
505-470-0060

April 17, 2020

New Mexico Departments of Agriculture and Tourism promote local businesses during stay-at-home order

Residents statewide encouraged to support local products

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LAS CRUCES – While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact the lives of residents across the state, the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) and New Mexico Tourism Department (NMTD) are partnering to encourage support of homegrown and homemade products.

NMDA and NMTD are encouraging New Mexico residents to support New Mexico agribusinesses, restaurants, artisans, merchants, processors and growers by ordering take-out from local restaurants and shopping at stores, farmers’ markets and online for locally-sourced and produced products.

NMTD will begin promoting New Mexico True Certified products through social media to encourage residents to support local businesses. NMTD also created an?online catalog?of New Mexico True Certified products for shoppers who wish to purchase directly online.

“New Mexico’s agribusinesses are the heart of our state, and as all New Mexico citizens experience unprecedented interruptions to daily life, it is important now more than ever to recognize the needs of our local growers and agribusiness owners, whose livelihoods are being affected,” Cabinet Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said. “By ordering take-out from your favorite New Mexico restaurants, shopping for locally-made and sourced products in stores and online, or purchasing a gift card from a nearby business, you will be supporting our New Mexico neighbors and our state’s economy during this critical time.”

“It’s incredibly important to support our local businesses and merchants during this difficult time,” said Cabinet Secretary of Tourism Jen Paul Schroer. “This campaign features authentic New Mexican products available for online purchase. Behind every product is a story about a farmer, an artist, or a merchant sharing their talent to make something special for the world to enjoy.”

The efforts by NMDA and NMTD to encourage support of local business coincide with the Economic Development Department’s Buy for Tomorrow Today campaign (https://www.buynmlocal.com/)?where residents are encouraged to provide immediate support for New Mexico businesses by purchasing gift cards and gift certificates for later use.

Both NMDA and NMTD have logo programs to identify locally-sourced products.

NMDA has the New Mexico—Taste the Tradition? and New Mexico—Grown with Tradition? logo program. NMTD’s New Mexico True Certified Program allows New Mexico businesses with products 100 percent made or grown in New Mexico the opportunity to share their brand with the power of New Mexico True.

For more information about the New Mexico —Taste the Tradition? and New Mexico—Grown with Tradition? logo programs, contact Felicia Frost at?FFrost@nmda.nmsu.edu?or 575-646-1939. Like Taste the Tradition on Facebook??https://www.facebook.com/tastenewmexico/?and follow them on Instagram @tastethetradition.

New Mexico businesses that offer products 100 percent produced or grown in New Mexico can join the New Mexico True Certified Program online. For more information, visit www.newmexico.org/industry/work-together/true-certified

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Vesicular Stomatitis Confirmed in New Mexico Horses

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

?

Contact: Dr. Ralph Zimmerman

State Veterinarian, New Mexico Livestock Board

www.nmlbonline.com

Ralph.Zimmerman@state.nm.us

505-841-6161

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April 15, 2020

Vesicular Stomatitis Confirmed in New Mexico Horses – April 2020

ALBUQUERQUE – On April 13, 2020, the National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, confirmed a finding of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection (Indiana serotype) on an equine premises in Dona Ana County, New Mexico.? A single horse on the index premises has met the case definition of infection with compatible clinical signs and virus isolation positive results. A second equine premises in Sierra County, New Mexico subsequently met confirmed VSV case definition with compatible clinical signs and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-positive results for VSV (Indiana serotype).? This is the 2020 VSV index case for the United States and subsequent VSV case for New Mexico.?

The epidemiological investigations on both VSV-positive premises indicate that incursion of VSV-infected insect vectors is the likely source of infection in these herds.? Biosecurity measures and vector mitigation have been instituted to reduce spread of the virus.? Please see the USDA APHIS Veterinary Services website to read the current situation report.??

What Veterinarians Need to Know:

This case in New Mexico indicates that we could see additional cases during the upcoming insect vector season.??

?All suspect VSV cases in horses and livestock must be investigated by state or federal animal health officials.

Any vesicular disease of livestock and horses is reportable to the State Veterinarian’s Office in Albuquerque, NM.? Report any cases that have clinical signs suggestive of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) immediately by calling 505-841-6161.?

Veterinarians may also contact the state or federal field veterinarian in your area.?

?Vesicular Stomatitis Background:

The goal in the management of the disease is to accomplish effective control while minimizing the negative economic impacts to livestock owners.??

Vesicular Stomatitis is a viral disease that primarily affects horses and cattle and rarely in swine, sheep, goats, llamas, and alpacas.? The transmission of VSV is not completely understood, but includes insect vectors such as black flies, sand flies, and biting midges.?

The incubation period ranges from 2-8 days.? Clinical signs include vesicles, erosions, and sloughing of the skin on the muzzle, tongue, teats, ear tips, and coronary bands.? Often excessive salivation is the first sign of disease, along with a reluctance to eat or drink. Lameness and weight loss may follow.??

Humans may become infected when handling affected animals, but this is a rare event.? To avoid human exposure, individuals should use personal protective measures when handling affected animals.??

?Tips for Livestock and Horse Owners:

  • Strict fly control is an important factor to inhibit the transmission of the disease.
  • Avoid transferring feeding equipment, cleaning tools, or health care equipment from other herds.
  • New Mexico fairs, livestock exhibitions, and rodeos may institute new entry requirements based on the extent and severity of the VSV outbreak.??
    • If you are participating in an event, please contact the event organizers prior to travel to determine if entry requirements may have changed.??
    • A certificate of veterinary inspection (health certificate) issued within 2-5 days prior to an event can be beneficial in reducing risks.?Always check with the state of destination to determine if they have updated their VS requirements.
  • If moving livestock internationally, contact the USDA APHIS VS to determine if there are any movement restrictions or testing requirements for VSV.??

?Additional resources:

New Mexico Livestock Board Website

USDA APHIS Veterinary Services National VSV Update

New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory receives international accreditation


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Kristie Garcia
Public Affairs Director, New Mexico Department of Agriculture
krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu
575-646-2804

March 6, 2020

New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory receives international accreditation

Accreditation is a first for NMDA’s State Chemist Lab

LAS CRUCES – For the first time in its existence, the New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory is an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) accredited laboratory.

The ISO 17025: 2017 accreditation means that the lab has met specific criteria to qualify as an accredited testing lab, within a scope that includes chemical and biological methods for testing animal feed. The accreditation demonstrates the lab’s capacity to deliver reliable results.

Located in Las Cruces, the NMDA State Chemist Lab is primarily a compliance and regulatory lab. Its primary mission is to provide analytical support services to ensure that New Mexico’s citizens receive quality products, including animal feed, commercial fertilizers and commercial pesticides. These services ensure a level playing field for manufacturers and promote responsible environmental stewardship. The lab analyzes samples collected by NMDA inspectors from across the state.

Although the State Chemist Lab’s ISO 17025: 2017 accreditation specifically relates to animal feed, the lab follows the same quality management system when testing all products.

Tim Darden, NMDA’s Laboratory Division Director, said the accreditation process took 4-and-a-half years, and it means the lab provides quality defensible data to regulatory partners, programs and the public.

“This accreditation is important, because it allows cooperation with our federal partners,” said Darden. “Now that we have this accreditation, our federal partners do not have to re-test any products our regulatory program finds with violations or adulterants.”

Chemist Donna Goreham reviews results at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory in Las Cruces. The lab recently became an International Organization for Standardization 17025: 2017 accredited laboratory, within a scope that includes chemical and biological methods for testing animal feed.
Chemist Donna Goreham reviews results at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory in Las Cruces. The lab recently became an International Organization for Standardization 17025: 2017 accredited laboratory, within a scope that includes chemical and biological methods for testing animal feed. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

The accreditation process was part of a grant funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said the accreditation confirms the lab’s high standards of operation.

“The NMDA State Chemist Lab is an important component of our overall program to ensure regulatory integrity across New Mexico,” said Witte. “ISO accreditation validates that our staff is operating the lab at the highest standards. I am proud of our team. This lab recently celebrated its centennial – 100 years of operation, and its future is bright.”

The accreditation is valid for two years. During that time, the same accrediting body will perform a re-audit to ensure the lab continues to meet the standards. Then it will alternate between an on-site audit one year and an online audit the next year.

State chemist Stephen Lantz (left) and chemist Shahiduz Zaman (right) conduct testing at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory in Las Cruces. The lab recently became an International Organization for Standardization 17025: 2017 accredited laboratory, within a scope that includes chemical and biological methods for testing animal feed.
State chemist Stephen Lantz (left) and chemist Shahiduz Zaman (right) conduct testing at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s State Chemist Laboratory in Las Cruces. The lab recently became an International Organization for Standardization 17025: 2017 accredited laboratory, within a scope that includes chemical and biological methods for testing animal feed. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

More About the State Chemist Lab

  • Lab staff consists of a director, a state chemist, three chemists, a quality assurance manager, a regulatory clerk and three New Mexico State University students.
  • The lab has the capability to perform a wide variety of tests on feeds, fertilizers and pesticides, including – but not limited to – protein, fat and fiber content for animal feeds.
  • Testing is also performed on available nitrogen, potash and phosphoric acid content for fertilizers.
  • Testing includes identification and formula verification for pesticides.
  • All of these tests can be requested on a fee basis by private citizens and industry.

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New Mexico Organic Farming Conference announces 2020 award recipients

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Baylee Banks
Communications Assistant, New Mexico Department of Agriculture
bbanks@nmda.nmsu.edu
575-646-1864

March 5, 2020

New Mexico Organic Farming Conference announces 2020 award recipients

Haga clic aquí para la versión en espa?ol.

ALBUQUERQUE – Several individuals and businesses were recognized at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference (NMOFC) Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque. The Southwest’s largest organic agricultural gathering provided the opportunity for over 360 attendees to gain valuable knowledge on topics including watershed, soil health, organic farming, wholesale markets, how to support the next generation of farmers and ranchers and much more.

Following is a list of award recipients:

The Organic Farmer of the Year Award: Ron and Gayle Ice

Ron and Gayle Ice have been farming organically in Alcalde, New Mexico for 30 years, periodically selling their vegetables at the Santa Fe Farmers Market and Los Alamos Market. After suffering a recent stroke, Ron began teaching Gayle how to care for the farm with the help of their daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren as well as volunteers from the community. This year, the couple’s crop yielded a much larger amount of vegetables and fruits than expected, forcing them to find new ways to harvest their crop. A large amount of dried goods from Ron and Gayle’s farm have been donated to Kitchen Angels, an organization that provides free and nutritious meals to homebound individuals facing life-challenging conditions.

New Mexico Department of Agriculture Organic Program Supervisor Stacy Gerk (left) and Walking Trout Farm’s Joseph Marcoline (right) presented the Organic Farmer of the Year Award to Ron and Gayle Ice at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque.
New Mexico Department of Agriculture Organic Program Supervisor Stacy Gerk (left) and Walking Trout Farm’s Joseph Marcoline (right) presented the Organic Farmer of the Year Award to Ron and Gayle Ice at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque. (Photo courtesy Francisco Hatay)

Friend of Organic Agriculture Award: Aroma Coffee, Taos Roasters and Red Rock Roasters

Three New Mexico coffee roasting companies received the Friend of Organic Agriculture Award: Howard Stone (founder and chief executive officer of Aroma Coffee in Santa Fe), Nancy Hoyer (production roaster at Taos Roasters) and the Langer family (founders of Red Rock Roasters in Albuquerque). NMOFC organizers appreciate the roasting companies’ consistent dedication to producing fresh, organic coffee products.

New Mexico Department of Agriculture Organic Program Supervisor Stacy Gerk (left) and Walking Trout Farm’s Joseph Marcoline (right) presented one of three Friend of Organic Agriculture Awards to Rachel and Nancy Langer from Red Rock Roasters at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque.
New Mexico Department of Agriculture Organic Program Supervisor Stacy Gerk (left) and Walking Trout Farm’s Joseph Marcoline (right) presented one of three Friend of Organic Agriculture Awards to Rachel and Nancy Langer from Red Rock Roasters at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque. (Photo courtesy Francisco Hatay)

Educator of the Year Award: Dr. Stephanie Walker

Dr. Stephanie Walker has served as the Extension Vegetable Specialist in the Extension Plant Sciences Department at New Mexico State University (NMSU) since 2004, providing training and assistance in vegetable production throughout the state. Walker’s research at NMSU primarily focuses on breeding chile peppers for enhanced yield and quality. In addition to her work as a vegetable specialist at NMSU, Walker has also served as a Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Professional Development Coordinator for New Mexico since 2004.

New Mexico Department of Agriculture Organic Program Supervisor Stacy Gerk (left) and Walking Trout Farm’s Joseph Marcoline (right) presented the Educator of the Year Award to Dr. Stephanie Walker at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque.
New Mexico Department of Agriculture Organic Program Supervisor Stacy Gerk (left) and Walking Trout Farm’s Joseph Marcoline (right) presented the Educator of the Year Award to Dr. Stephanie Walker at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque. (Photo courtesy Francisco Hatay)

Good Earth Steward Award: Patchwork Farms, the Pope family

The Pope family began Patchwork Farms 20 years ago in the Estancia Valley. What originally began as a modest 20-acre hay farm has now grown into a 600-acre operation. Patchwork Farms yields a variety of produce including organic hay, corn, beans, popcorn, wheat and natural beef. The Pope family stewards its land in many ways, one of which involves naturally improving soil quality.

Young Farmer of the Year Award: Casey Holland

Casey Holland was born in Albuquerque and raised in Deming. She attended the University of New Mexico, where she studied psychology and sociology, never expecting that she would one day become a farmer. After meeting justice food organizers with the Southwest Organizing Project’s Feed the Hood Project, Holland discovered a passion for growing food and became inspired by the idea that doing so can help heal communities. This passion motivated Holland to manage Chispas Farm in the South Valley where she currently operates, growing over 120 varieties of fruits and vegetables while also producing eggs and milk.

Alongside conference facilitator Sage Faulkner, the conference was organized through a collaboration between the New Mexico Department of Agriculture’s Organic Program, the New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service, the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau and Walking Trout Farm.

New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau President Craig Ogden (left), Farm Bureau Financial Services agent Fred Porter (center left) and New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Facilitator Sage Faulkner (right) presented the Young Farmer of the Year Award to Casey Holland (center right) at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque.
New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau President Craig Ogden (left), Farm Bureau Financial Services agent Fred Porter (center left) and New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Facilitator Sage Faulkner (right) presented the Young Farmer of the Year Award to Casey Holland (center right) at the 2020 New Mexico Organic Farming Conference Feb. 21-22 in Albuquerque. (Photo courtesy Francisco Hatay)

For more information about the NMOFC, email sagefaulkner@yahoo.com, call 505-490-2822 or visit www.nmofc.org.

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Dr. Tim Hanosh of NMDA and NMSU named 2019 Veterinarian of the Year


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Contact: Kristie Garcia
Public Affairs Director, New Mexico Department of Agriculture
krgarcia@nmda.nmsu.edu
575-646-2804

Feb. 13, 2020

Dr. Tim Hanosh, director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Services Division, has been named the state’s 2019 Veterinarian of the Year by the New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association.
Dr. Tim Hanosh, director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Services Division, has been named the state’s 2019 Veterinarian of the Year by the New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association. (Photo courtesy New Mexico Department of Agriculture)

Dr. Tim Hanosh of NMDA and NMSU named 2019 Veterinarian of the Year

New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association to present award Feb. 22

Haga clic aquí para la versión en espa?ol.

ALBUQUERQUE – Dr. Tim Hanosh, director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Services Division, has been named the state’s 2019 Veterinarian of the Year by the New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association.

Hanosh oversees the division that conducts diagnostic analysis of animal specimens from veterinarians and agencies to determine the cause of deaths or to identify diseases. These specimens range from a tube of blood or piece of tissue to a large animal. Veterinary Diagnostic Services is located in Albuquerque, in the same building as the New Mexico Department of Health’s Scientific Laboratory Division.

Hanosh has been the director since July 2011.

With the New Mexico Department of Agriculture main building being housed on the campus of New Mexico State University in Las Cruces, the state agency and the state higher education institution work together on issues related to the agriculture industry. As part of the land-grant university system, NMDA falls under the purview of NMSU, and the NMSU Board of Regents serves as the state’s Board of Agriculture.

NMDA’s Veterinary Diagnostic Services works closely with NMSU Cooperative Extension Services, primarily Extension Veterinarian Dr. John Wenzel and the NMSU College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences Extension Animal Sciences and Natural Resources.

New Mexico Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte said Hanosh is an asset to the New Mexico community as a whole.

“Dr. Hanosh’s dedication to serving our New Mexico veterinarian community with timely and accurate animal health diagnostics is a testament to his dedication to the state,” said Witte. “Veterinary Diagnostic Services has grown its diagnostic submissions by nearly 20% since he was named director nine years ago.?We are proud of his leadership and the entire team at the lab.”

The purpose of the award is to recognize the veterinarian who has rendered outstanding service to the profession, has served as an outstanding representative of the profession to the general public and whose activities, civic involvement and lifestyle exemplify the type of professional person that all veterinarians can be proud of. The award recipient demonstrates a sincere concern for the image and advancement of the profession and demonstrates a dedication to a lifetime of learning. The recipient is willing to represent the profession honestly and well to young people considering veterinary medicine as a career choice.

Tamara Spooner, New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association Executive Director, said Hanosh has contributed greatly to the veterinary community and to the entire state of New Mexico over the span of his career.

“Dr. Hanosh is respected immensely, and this recognition is very much deserved,” said Spooner. “We are very happy to be presenting him with this award.”

Under the direction of Hanosh, NMDA’s Veterinary Diagnostic Services Division became a fully-certified International Organization for Standardization (ISO) laboratory in 2018 for the first time in its existence. The ISO 17025 certification means the lab has met specific criteria to qualify as an accredited testing lab. The accreditation demonstrates the lab’s capacity to deliver reliable results.

The Veterinarian of the Year award will be presented Feb. 22 in Albuquerque.

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Dr. Tim Hanosh (left), director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Services Division, participated in a New Mexico Agriculture Livestock Incident Response Team training exercise in 2018. Federal, state and local agencies came together to host an animal husbandry and biosecurity exercise to prepare responders for a potential emergency incident involving livestock in New Mexico. The New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association named Hanosh the state’s 2019 Veterinarian of the Year by.
Dr. Tim Hanosh (left), director of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture Veterinary Diagnostic Services Division, participated in a New Mexico Agriculture Livestock Incident Response Team training exercise in 2018. Federal, state and local agencies came together to host an animal husbandry and biosecurity exercise to prepare responders for a potential emergency incident involving livestock in New Mexico. The New Mexico Veterinary Medical Association named Hanosh the state’s 2019 Veterinarian of the Year. (New Mexico State University Photo by Jane Moorman)